e-Governance

Cyber criminals rely on mind games to loot people

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McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

McAfee has recently announced the results of a groundbreaking study that details the psychological games and other tactics, which cyber-criminals use in social engineering scams propagated through junk e-mails.

In the study titled “Mind Games”, conducted by Dr. James Blascovich (the primary author), Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, There is analysis of multiple common scam e-mails and provides surprising insights into how cyber-criminals use fear, greed and lust to methodically steal personal and proprietary financial information over the Internet.  Scam spam works best by providing recipients with a sense of familiarity and legitimacy, either by creating the illusion that the email is from a friend or colleague, or providing plausible warnings from a respected institution. Once the victim opens the email, criminals use two basic motivational processes, approach and avoidance, or a combination of the two, to persuade victims to click on dangerous links, provide personal information, or download risky files. By scamming $20 from just half of one per cent of the US population, cyber-criminals can earn $15 million each day and nearly $5.5 billion in a year, a powerful attraction for skillful scam artists. Cyber-criminals acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and financial data, by masquerading as a familiar or nationally recognized bank, credit card company or even an online auction site. Dr Blascovich also reports on a category of scam emails that target consumers who are promotion focused and/or capitalize on consumers' greed.

The same psychological practices used by cyber criminals were also investigated in a European report, commissioned by McAfee in association with leading forensic psychologist, Professor Clive Hollin, based at University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

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